For their thirtieth anniversary, thirty things they do at the Free Software Foundation.

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) turned thirty years old on October 4th, 2015. They celebrated the occasion -not just what it means for the organization, but what it means for the success and longevity of the free software movement- with a daytime User Freedom Summit, followed by an evening party featuring toasts by longtime friends and associates of the FSF, and an address by their president Richard M. Stallman (RMS). Friends around the world also celebrated, putting on over 22 events in 8 countries. Individuals who couldn’t attend events watched their free-software-powered video stream.

How to encrypt a USB storage device with ‘Linux Unified Key Setup’ (LUKS).

The Linux Unified Key Setup or LUKS is a disk-encryption specification created by Clemens Fruhwirth and originally intended for GNU/Linux. While most disk encryption software implements different and incompatible, undocumented formats, LUKS specifies a platform-independent standard on-disk format for use in various tools. This facilitates compatibility and interoperability amongst different programs.

The reference implementation for LUKS operates on GNU/Linux and is based on an enhanced version of cryptsetup, using dm-crypt as the disk encryption backend. Under Microsoft Windows, LUKS-encrypted disks can be used with FreeOTFE (discontinued) or DoxBox.

Amazon policy file for WordPress W3 Total Cache and S3-based CDNs.

If you are using S3 as a CDN, you will need to give WordPress' W3TC plugin access to your AWS account so it can upload files to S3 on behalf of you. The smart way to do this is to create a new AWS user who can only access what they need for W3TC to do its job. Who wants to store the keys to their whole AWS account in their WordPress based site? If that information is retrieved by a hacker, they could do tons of damage. If they only gain access to your site’s specific bucket, there is less damage to be done.